Wednesday, March 15, 2006

Things that can kill your dog (9)

Things that can kill you dog (9): Peach Pits: With most fruits, the pits and the seeds are toxic to dogs. Signs of poisoning include drooling, vomiting, and lethargy. If you suspect your dog has eaten a peach pit or the pit or seeds of any fruit, take him to the veterinarian immediately.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Things that can kill your dog (8)

Things that can kill your dog (8): Mouthwash: Mouthwash can contain boric acid which is highly toxic to dogs. Symptoms of poisoning by mouthwash include vomiting, drooling, seizures, and coma. You should take your dog to the veterinarian immediately if you suspect poisoning by mouthwash or other household item containing boric acid like contact lens solution or denture cleaner.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Friday, March 03, 2006

Things that can kill your dog (7)

Things that can kill your dog (7): Fabric Softeners and other detergents: All sorts of household detergents are toxic to dogs at one level or another, but fabric softeners fall into the highly toxic category. Signs of toxicity include vomiting, lethargy, burns to the mouth, drooling, muscle weakness, and even coma. Do NOT induce vomiting if your dog has ingested any detergent. Contact your veterinarian immediately.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Thursday, March 02, 2006

Things that can kill your dog (6)!

Things that can kill your dog (6) Moth Balls: Moth balls are very dangerous to dogs. They contain an insecticide that causes central nervous system excitement and seizures. When metabolized, ingestion of moth balls can lead to liver failure. Symptoms of poisoning by moth balls include vomiting and seizures. If your dog has consumed moth balls, do NOT induce vomiting. Seek veterinary care immediately.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Monday, February 27, 2006

Things that can kill your dog (5)

Things that can kil your dog (5): Watch Batteries: If your dog ingests a watch battery, it can cause a potentially fatal ulceration in the stomach within 12 hours. All other alkaline batteries are toxic to dogs as well. Symptoms of toxicity include drooling, lack of appetite, vomiting, and lethargy. If you suspect your dog has ingested a watch battery, contact your vet immediately.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Sunday, February 26, 2006

More things that can kill your dog

More things that can kill your dog: Tylenol: As little as two regular strength Tylenol tablets can kill a small dog. Dogs lack the proper liver enzymes to break down acetaminophen. Signs of toxicity include drooling, lethargy, and abdominal pain. If you suspect your dog has ingested Tylenol, call your veterinarian immediately.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Saturday, February 25, 2006

Things that can kill your dog

Things that can kill your dog: Bleach: As you might imagine, household bleach is toxic to dogs. Keep all products containing bleach out of your dog’s reach. Symptoms of bleach poisoning include drooling, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Do NOT induce vomiting if you suspect your dog has ingested bleach and contact your veterinarian immediately.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Wednesday, February 22, 2006

More Dog Adoption Issues

When contemplating adoption, prospective new owners should be prepared to deal with the fact that their new adoptee may not be completely housebroken. Previous owners may have been irresponsible in their approach to this training; furthermore, when the dog was placed in the shelter it continued to do its “business” right in its pen. Housebreaking is not a complex chore and should not deter someone from adopting a pet. Some owners will use a cage to assist in this training, while others will just take the dog out for a walk several times a day. Fenced yards and doggie doors are minimal expenses that pay extra dividends on cold or rainy days. Adopted dogs are subject to all of the behavioral problems commonly associated to dogs in general. These would include digging, jumping up on people, jumping fences, barking and nipping. There are proven solutions to all of these “offenses.” If your dog is prone to digging, and always digs in one area, there are a number of effective repellent sprays that work well. If he digs under your fence, a little buried chicken wire works wonders in breaking that habit. Spray bottles filled with water should be kept at hand to break a dog from jumping up and to combat incessant barking. A quick spritz in the face immediately following, or during, the offensive behavior will usually bring about a quick behavior modification.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Tuesday, February 21, 2006

When not to adopt a dog

Adopting a dog as a means of entertaining a small child is not recommended. A dog is not a toy and should not be treated as one. Small children should be trained to understand “animal etiquette”. In other words, animals are not to be hit, dragged, ridden or teased. They should understand that being overly aggressive with a new dog, especially one recently adopted, could cause the dog to react by biting or running away. If feeding and exercising the dog is to be the responsibility of a child, an adult should follow up to be sure these things are getting done. It isn’t the dog’s fault if a child fails to meet his or her obligations and the dog shouldn’t have to suffer for the child’s failure. Many adopted dogs will come to the new surroundings filled with fears based upon earlier mistreatment or the harsh rules of their previous owners. Some dogs will be reluctant to go from one room to another, will shy away when corrected and hide upon hearing a loud noise. New owners must be patient with them and speak to them softly and affectionately. Dogs are not stupid and they will gradually come to understand their new environment and show their appreciation for your loving care.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Wednesday, February 15, 2006

Adoption: What to expect from your new dog

Adoption: What to expect from a new dog: When considering the birth rates among animals, it’s not hard to understand why animal shelters are always filled with animals waiting to be adopted. Shockingly, it has been calculated that over a seven year period, one female cat and her offspring will produce approximately 420,000 kittens. Likewise, one female dog and her offspring will produce 67,000 puppies during a six year period. Since there are more animals looking for homes than there are people who want to adopt them, some 6.5 million animals are euthanized each year. Given the statistics cited above, adopting an animal can be a kind and loving thing to do. However, before making the final decision to adopt, there are a number of things to consider. Many of the animals awaiting adoption in shelters have had very rough beginnings. Some were abused, some abandoned and some were “turned in” because the owners didn’t have time for them. Many were left alone for long periods and some were never properly potty trained. In short, when adopting an animal you must be prepared to work with them. They may come to you cowed or with feelings of trepidation and may be overly sensitive to your tone of voice or to any commands you might give them. You will need to be patient and by all means, loving. When they finally realize that they can trust you they will reward you with more affection and loyalty than you can imagine."


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Tuesday, February 14, 2006

Did you just eat that?

Did you just eat that? Dogs and More!: "Did you just eat that? 10 things found in your home that can kill your dog
Dogs are very curious animals and as omnivores and natural scavengers, can get into and eat just about anything. However, there are many toxic substances found in your home that could potentially kill your dog. The following is a list of ten common household substances that you should make sure to keep out of your dog’s reach. 1) Antifreeze: Many people do not realize it, but common antifreeze kills many pets each year. It smells and tastes very sweet to your dog and is very appealing to him. Ethylene glycol is toxic however, and each winter, many animals are killed by it. Symptoms of toxicity include seizures, vomiting, stumbling and lethargy leading to kidney failure. Make sure to keep your antifreeze out of your dog’s reach. If you suspect that your dog has ingested antifreeze, take your dog to the veterinarian immediately. 2) Chocolate: Chocolate contains a substance called the obromine which is toxic to dogs. Baking chocolate and dark chocolate is especially dangerous. While it usually takes a somewhat large amount of chocolate to kill a dog, poisoning and death does occur with smaller amounts ingested. Signs of chocolate poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, increased urination, and increased activity. This can progress to seizures and unusual heart rhythms. Call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your dog has eaten chocolate."


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Monday, February 13, 2006

Dogs for people with farms

If you have a farm and work livestock, you may want to consider one of the dogs in the herding group. These dogs include the Border Collie, the Australian Shepherd, the German Shepherd, and the Shetland Sheepdog. The Border Collie is a very intelligent dog that requires a lot of exercise, both physical and mental. If you want to spend a lot of active time with a dog, you might choose a dog like this. You may be interested in considering a mixed breed dog. These dogs can be wonderful family companions, as much so as purebred dogs. Due to the large population of dogs, many people are interested in adopting a dog. Talk to your local humane society or breed rescue organization for assistance with adoption. The most important thing to do when choosing a dog is to take your time and get to know many different breeds of dog. Talk to pet store personnel, groomers, breeders, and your veterinary staff for assistance. Make sure to consider all aspects of dog care and you can ensure a happy time for your new dog and family.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Friday, February 10, 2006

Toy dogs, anyone?

Toy dogs are very popular today as you see many celebrities toting around their adorable little dogs. But don’t let the size fool you. Oftentimes, these cute little dogs have big personalities. Dogs in this group include the Pug, the Shih Tzu, the Pomeranian, and the Maltese. These small dogs still require training and a fair amount of exercise, but may be a better choice for apartment dwellers and people with older children.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Wednesday, February 08, 2006

New Puppy


Meet Peachy, my new puppy. A gift from a neighbor friend, Peachy brings fun and joy to my family. This picture was taken when she was two months old. Now she's almost 3. Peachy loves milk and pedigree dog treats and denta. For her regular meals, she eats pedigree milk pockets puppy food. She also takes her regular dose of vitamin c, as prescribed by her vet, Dr. G. Its a good thing we found Dr. G. His clinic is only 10 minutes away from home. She's already been there a few times and has been given her initial shots and deworming dose. Peachy now feels so at ease and relaxed with us. She truly is a welcome addition, surprising us with her warm welcome barks and tail wagging when we arrive. And ohhh she loves to play, and indeed a lot of the family's free time is spent playing and laughing with her. We took her to mcdonald's for breakfast one sunday morning, she was so well behaved, except when she barked at the security guard when the guard surprised her. I'm sure we could look ahead to a lot of more fun and adventure with our new family addition.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Tuesday, February 07, 2006

More Dog Choices

If you are planning on hunting with your dog, you may want to consider one of the sporting breeds. The most popular of the sporting group are the Labrador Retriever and the Golden Retriever. Both are relatively easy to train and are good with children. You will want to have a more active lifestyle and ideally a fenced in yard if you are looking for a dog of this nature. Many people prefer dogs from the AKC�s working group. Breeds that belong to this group include the Rottweiler, the Siberian Husky, the Akita, the Bullmastiff, and the Giant Schnauzer. Generally, these dogs require an experienced owner who can firmly establish leadership. Many of the dogs of the working group have thick undercoats and shed a lot, so you will want to consider if this is something you want to deal with. You also want to make sure you choose a dog in this category from a reputable breeder as hip dysplasia is common in these breeds.


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com

Monday, February 06, 2006

Getting A New Dog

Getting a new dog is one of the greatest joys in the world. Make this great time even better by knowing exactly what kind of dog will complement your family�s lifestyle. Before you get a dog, you will want to make sure to discuss with your family who will have the primary responsibility of taking care of and training the dog. You will want to find a good veterinarian close by, and you will want to consider the cost of keeping a dog. You will also want to make sure to have supplies such as bowls, a bed, a crate, leash , collar, and toys prior to your new dog coming home. Also before you get your new dog, you will want to consider different breeds and their compatibility to your lifestyle. Large dogs are generally not for apartment dwellers or the elderly. Small dogs are not for people who want to be active with their dogs. Temperament is another thing to consider. You will also want to decide if you want a puppy or an older dog. Certain breeds have inherent health problems like eye problems or hip dysplasia, so you will want to take all of that into consideration before choosing a breed. If you decide to get a purebred puppy, there are resources to help you find a reputable breeder. Your local kennel club has access to area breeders that specialize in certain breeds. If you are looking for an older dog, this can also be a good resource as many breeders may have adult dogs available as well. "


Donnis Barron
Dogs and More!
donnis@wizchamp.com
http://www.WizChamp.com